Franco Donatoni – Hot

CLASSICAL Senza categoria Video

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Franco Donatoni – Hot

Franco Donatoni

Franco Donatoni

Franco Donatoni (9 June 1927 – 17 August 2000) was an Italian composer.

Biography

Born in Verona, Donatoni started studying violin at the age of seven, and frequented the local Music Academy. Later he studied at the Milan Conservatory and Bologna Conservatory.

At least three generations of composers studied with Donatoni. Among his Italian pupils were Sandro Gorli, Matteo D’Amico, Roberto Carnevale, Giulio Castagnoli, Ivan Fedele, Luigi Manfrin, Giorgio Magnanensi, Luca Mosca, Riccardo Nova Riccardo Piacentini, Fausto Romitelli, Giuseppe Sinopoli, Alessandro Solbiati, Piero Niro, Claudio Scannavini, Giovanni Verrando, and among his foreign pupils Michael Dellaira, Pascal Dusapin, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Magnus Lindberg, Katia Tiutiunnik, Javier Torres Maldonado, and Juan Trigos. See: List of music students by teacher: A to F#Franco Donatoni.

Donatoni died in Milan in 2000, wishing to work in his second book of his monumental “Arte della Fuga”, for large orchestra, based on the original work of Johann Sebastian Bach.

Franco Donatoni - Hot

 

Luciano Berio LINEA

CLASSICAL Senza categoria Video

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Luciano Berio LINEA

Luciano Berio

Luciano Berio, Cavaliere di Gran Croce OMRI[1] (October 24, 1925 – May 27, 2003) was an Italian composer. He is noted for his experimental work (in particular his 1968 composition Sinfonia and his series of virtuosic solo pieces titled Sequenza) and also for his pioneering work in electronic music.

Biography

Berio was born in Oneglia (now part of Imperia). He was taught the piano by his father and grandfather who were both organists. During World War II he was conscripted into the army, but on his first day he injured his hand while learning how a gun worked, and spent time in a military hospital. Following the war, Berio studied at the Milan Conservatory under Giulio Cesare Paribeni and Giorgio Federico Ghedini. He was unable to continue studying the piano because of his injured hand, so instead concentrated on composition. In 1947 came the first public performance of one of his works, a suite for piano. Berio made a living at this time accompanying singing classes, and it was in doing this that he met the American mezzo-soprano Cathy Berberian, whom he married shortly after graduating (they divorced in 1964). Berio wrote a number of pieces which exploit her distinctive voice.

In 1952, Berio went to the United States to study with Luigi Dallapiccola at Tanglewood, from whom he gained an interest in serialism. He later attended the Internationale Ferienkurse für Neue Musik at Darmstadt, where he met Pierre Boulez, Karlheinz Stockhausen, György Ligeti and Mauricio Kagel. He became interested in electronic music, co-founding the Studio di Fonologia, an electronic music studio in Milan, with Bruno Maderna in 1955. He invited a number of significant composers to work there, among them Henri Pousseur and John Cage. He also produced an electronic music periodical, Incontri Musicali.

In 1960, Berio returned to Tanglewood, this time as Composer in Residence, and in 1962, on an invitation from Darius Milhaud, took a teaching post at Mills College in Oakland, California. From 1960 to 1962 Berio also taught at the Dartington International Summer School. In 1965 he began to teach at the Juilliard School, and there he founded the Juilliard Ensemble, a group dedicated to performances of contemporary music. In 1966, he again married, this time to the noted philosopher of science Susan Oyama (they divorced in 1972). His students included Louis Andriessen, Steven Gellman, Dina Koston, Steve Reich, Luca Francesconi, Giulio Castagnoli, Flavio Emilio Scogna, William Schimmel and Phil Lesh of the Grateful Dead. See: List of music students by teacher: A to F#Luciano Berio.

All this time Berio had been steadily composing and building a reputation, winning the Prix Italia in 1966 for Laborintus II. His reputation was cemented when his Sinfonia was premiered in 1968. In 1972, Berio returned to Italy. From 1974–80 he acted as director of the electro-acoustic division of IRCAM in Paris, and in 1977 he married the musicologist Talia Pecker. In 1987 he opened Tempo Reale, a centre for musical research and production based in Florence. In 1988 he was made an Honorary Member of the Royal Academy of Music, London. In 1989 he received the Ernst von Siemens Music Prize. He was elected a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1994. The same year, he became Distinguished Composer in Residence at Harvard University, remaining there until 2000. In 1993/94 he gave the Charles Eliot Norton lectures at Harvard, later published as Remembering the Future. He was active as a conductor and continued to compose to the end of his life. In 2000, he became Presidente and Sovrintendente at theAccademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia in Rome. Luciano Berio died in 2003 in a hospital in Rome. He was an atheist.

Luciano Berio LINEA

 

Bela Bartok Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion

CLASSICAL Senza categoria Video

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Bela Bartok Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion

La Jolla Music Society’s SummerFest

(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) Bela Bartok’s Sonata for Two Pianos & Percussion grew out the composer’s interest in the piano as a percussive rather than a lyrical instrument. Though rarely performed, since it requires the unusual combination of two superb pianists and two virtuoso percussionists, the Sonata is considered one of Bartok’s most individualistic and expressive works. Series: “La Jolla Music Society: SummerFest” [Arts and Music] [Show ID: 25808]

Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion

The Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion, Sz. 110, BB 115 is a musical piece written by Hungarian composer Béla Bartók in 1937.It was premiered by him and his second wife, Ditta Pásztory-Bartók, with the percussionists Fritz Schiesser and Philipp Rühlig at theInternational Society for Contemporary Music (ISCM) anniversary concert of 16 January 1938 in Basel, Switzerland,[2] where it received enthusiastic reviews. Bartók and his wife also played the piano parts for the American premiere which took place in New York City’s Town Hall in 1940, with the percussionists Saul Goodman and Henry Deneke. It has since become one of Bartók’s most performed works.

The score requires four performers: two pianists and two percussionists, who play seven instruments between them: timpani, bass drum (gran cassa), cymbals, triangle, snare drum (both on- and off- snares), tam-tam (gong) and xylophone. In the published score the composer provides highly detailed instructions for the percussionists, stipulating, for example, which part of a suspended cymbal is to be struck with what type of stick. He also provides precise instructions for the platform layout of the four players and their instruments.

Bela Bartok- Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion - La Jolla Music Society's SummerFest_

 

Messiaen: Quartet for the End of Time

CLASSICAL Senza categoria

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Messiaen: Quartet for the End of Time

Quatuor pour la fin du temps

Quatuor pour la fin du temps (French pronunciation: ​[kwatɥɔʁ puʁ la fɛ̃ dy tɑ̃]), also known by its English title Quartet for the End of Time, is a piece of chamber music by theFrench composer Olivier Messiaen. It was premiered in 1941. The piece is scored for clarinet (in B-flat), violin, cello, and piano; a typical performance of the complete work lasts about 50 minutes.

Composition and first performance[edit]

Messiaen was 31 years old when France entered World War II. He was captured by the German army in June 1940 and imprisoned in Stalag VIII-A, a prisoner-of-war camp inGörlitz, Germany (now Zgorzelec, Poland). While in transit to the camp, Messiaen showed the clarinetist Henri Akoka, also a prisoner, the sketches for what would become Abîme des oiseaux. Two other professional musicians, violinist Jean le Boulaire and cellist Étienne Pasquier, were among his fellow prisoners, and after he managed to obtain some paper and a small pencil from a sympathetic guard (Carl-Albert Brüll, 1902-1989), Messiaen wrote a short trio for them; this piece developed into the Quatuor for the same trio with himself at the piano. The combination of instruments is unusual, but not without precedent: Walter Rabl had composed for it in 1896, as had Paul Hindemith in 1938.

The quartet was premiered at the camp, outdoors and in the rain, on 15 January 1941. The musicians had decrepit instruments and an audience of about 400 fellow prisoners and guards. Messiaen later recalled: “Never was I listened to with such rapt attention and comprehension.”

Brüll provided paper and isolation for composing, and he also helped acquire the three other instruments. By forging papers with a stamp made from a potato, Brüll even helped the performers to be liberated shortly after the performance. After the war, Brüll made a special trip to visit Messiaen, but was sent away and told the composer would not see him.

Rostropovich – BACH

CLASSICAL Senza categoria Video

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Rostropovich – BACH

Mstislav Rostropovich

Mstislav Rostropovich

Mstislav Leopoldovich “Slava” Rostropovich, KBE (Russian: Мстисла́в Леопо́льдович Ростропо́вич, Mstislav Leopol’dovič Rostropovič, pronounced [rəstrɐˈpəvʲɪtɕ]; March 27, 1927 – April 27, 2007), was a Soviet and Russian cellist and conductor. He is considered to be one of the greatest cellists of the 20th century. In addition to his interpretations and technique, he was well known for both inspiring and commissioning new works, which enlarged the cello repertoire more than any cellist before or since. He gave the premieres of over 100 pieces,[1] forming long-standing friendships and artistic partnerships with composers including Dmitri Shostakovich, Sergei Prokofiev,Henri Dutilleux, Witold Lutoslawski, Olivier Messiaen, Luciano Berio, Krzysztof Penderecki, Alfred Schnittke, Norbert Moret, Andreas Makris and Benjamin Britten.

Rostropovich was internationally recognized as a staunch advocate of human rights, and was awarded the 1974 Award of the International League of Human Rights. He was married to the soprano Galina Vishnevskaya and had two daughters, Olga and Elena Rostropovich.

 

TWENTY ONE

CLASSICAL Experimental Senza categoria

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TWENTY ONE

Quincy Ledbetter and Ryan Conner catch Andy Akiho and Mariel Roberts performing an original piece entitled, “21”.

Composed by Andy Akiho. andyakiho.com
Mariel Roberts: marielroberts.com

Andy Akiho  Bio from official site :

Described as “mold-breaking” and “vital” by The New York Times and as “a young composer to watch” by The LA Times, Andy Akiho is an eclectic and contemporary composer/performer whose interests run from steel pan to traditional classical music. Recent engagements include a commission by Carnegie Hall premiered by Ensemble ACJW, a world premiere commissioned by the New York Philharmonic, a performance with the LA Philharmonic, a tour in Taiwan for the 2012 International Drum Festival, and three shows at the Kennedy Center in Washington DC featuring original compositions. His rhythmic compositions continue to increase in recognition: selected from an initial pool of over 500 applicants, Akiho won the grand prize for the 2011 Make Music National Composition Competition hosted by the Grammy-winning ensemble eighth blackbird and, in 2012, he won the Carlsbad Composer Competition to write a piece for the Calder String Quartet. Other recent awards include a 2012 Chamber Music America Grant with Sybarite5, the 2011 Woods Chandler Memorial Prize, a 2011 Music Alumni Award, the 2010 Horatio Parker Award at the Yale School of Music, three ASCAP Plus Awards, an ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composers Award, and a 2008 Brian M. Israel Prize. Akiho has composed for ETHEL, the Atlanta Symphony National Snare Drum Competition, the Bang on a Can Marathon, The Playground Ensemble, and the Norfolk Chamber Music Festival. Akiho’s compositions have been heard in a range of venues, including the Walt Disney Concert Hall, Symphony Space, Carnegie Hall, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, MoMA, Lincoln Center, Merkin Hall, MIT’s Kresge Auditorium, MASS MoCA, MCA Chicago, (le) Poisson Rouge, and John Zorn’s The Stone. His works have been featured on PBS’s “News Hour with Jim Lehrer” and by organizations such as Meet the Composer, Bang on a Can, American Composers Forum, and The Society for New Music.

 

Mariel Roberts Bio from Official Site :

“Trailblazing” cellist Mariel Roberts (Feast of Sounds) is quickly gaining recognition as a deeply dedicated interpreter and performer of contemporary music. Recent performances have garnered praise for her “technical flair and exquisite sensitivity” (American Composers Forum), as well as her ability to “couple youthful vision with startling maturity”. (InDigest Magazine). She holds degrees from both the Eastman School and the Manhattan School of Music, where she specialized in contemporary performance practice while studying with Alan Harris and Fred Sherry. Mariel performs internationally as a member of the Mivos String Quartet, and has performed with a variety of other ensembles in venues around the world as an advocate of living composers.  

TWENTY ONE
TWENTY ONE

 

Carmina Burana

CLASSICAL Experimental Senza categoria Video

Carmina Burana

Before any player of the road, then a barrage of surprises never end for one of the most incredible performances that have ever been seen in a train station, took place on 23 April 2012, but still viral. The flash mob was the protagonist of the Vienna Volksoper Orchestra, in a project to spread the passion for the Opera

Wagner – Die Walküre – Prelude 1º Act. Scala, Barenboim

CLASSICAL Senza categoria Video

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Wagner – Die Walküre – Prelude 1º Act. Scala, Barenboim

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Wagner Die Walküre “Prelude 2º Act. and first scene” Scala, Barenb

 

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The Ride of the Valkyries. Scala Milano. Barenboim

Rachmaninoff: Pianoconcerto no.2 op.18 – Anna Fedorova

CLASSICAL Senza categoria Video

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Rachmaninoff: Pianoconcerto no.2 op.18 – Anna Fedorova

Meer concerten en gratis downloads ophttp://zondagochtendconcert.avro.nl

Nordwestdeutsche Philharmonie o.l.v. Martin Panteleev
Anna Fedorova, piano

Opgenomen 1 september – Concertgebouw, Amsterdam

Rachmaninovs Tweede pianoconcert is zijn populairste: het is te horen in vele films en is een mijlpaal in de carrière van alle grote pianisten.

From Wikipedia :

The Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minorOp. 18, is a concerto for piano and orchestra composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff between the autumn of 1900 and April 1901.[1] The second and third movements were first performed with the composer as soloist on 2 December 1900.[2] The complete work was premiered, again with the composer as soloist, on 9 November 1901,[2] with his cousin Alexander Siloti conducting.

Rachmaninoff: Pianoconcerto no.2 op.18 - Anna Fedorova